thegetty:

"I have at this moment a series of experimental drawings that I’m fairly pleased with…it’s like an impression and yet isn’t." Paul Gauguin

This double-sided depiction of Eve in the Garden of Eden was made using a technique invented by Gauguin near the end of his life in French Polynesia. The double impression of the image reflects such dueling themes as good vs. evil and other complicated motifs associated with the fall of man. Is Eve confident or baleful? Shameful or assertive? And similarly ambiguous: the hooded rider may be inspired by a Parthenon frieze, or represent a darker death character.

Eve (‘The Nightmare’), 1899–1990, Paul Gauguin. Black printer’s ink, ochre ink, liquid solvent on wove paper (recto); graphite and blue crayon pencil with traces of diluted oil medium (verso). The J. Paul Getty Museum

Reblogged from The Getty
tierradentro:

“Haymaking”, 1889, Paul Gauguin.

tierradentro:

Haymaking”, 1889, Paul Gauguin.

Reblogged from Tundras
acqua-di-fiori:

Gauguin - Spirit

acqua-di-fiori:

Gauguin - Spirit

Reblogged from Acqua Di Fiori
post-impressionisms:

Self Portrait dedicated to Vincent van Gogh (Les Miserables), Paul Gauguin. 1888.
The year 1888 was very important both for van Gogh and Gauguin. At this time, Gauguin began to go in search of “simpler settings”, and went at first to Brittany. He would later move to Tahiti, where his fascination with “primitism”, (I put this in parentheses because it is a very condescending term for the people concerned) the idea of non-Western or less technologically advanced cultures living purer, simpler lifestyles, and thus were more suitable for his study than say, Parisians. In 1888, van Gogh would leave the bustling city for the more calming, beautiful countryside of southern France, where many Impressionists before had fallen in love with the landscapes and abundance of natural light.
During 1888, van Gogh and Gauguin exchanged various self portraits with each other as a way to communicate how they wished the world to view them and their art. In this portrait, Gauguin paints himself in a rough manner, as an outlaw even. The title, “Les Miserables,” was of course a very popular French Romantic work by Victor Hugo at the time (and still remains a classic today), and he painted himself in the guise of Jean Valjean, an ex-convict, because he viewed himself as an outcast from decadent society. Van Gogh, however, expressed displeasure with this painting, because he believed “that it expressed torment while failing to offer any hope or consolation”. Both men were fascinated with Japanese block prints at this time, and their influence is obvious in the two-dimensional, bright colors of the wallpaper behind Gauguin. 
Image source

post-impressionisms:

Self Portrait dedicated to Vincent van Gogh (Les Miserables),
Paul Gauguin. 1888.

The year 1888 was very important both for van Gogh and Gauguin. At this time, Gauguin began to go in search of “simpler settings”, and went at first to Brittany. He would later move to Tahiti, where his fascination with “primitism”, (I put this in parentheses because it is a very condescending term for the people concerned) the idea of non-Western or less technologically advanced cultures living purer, simpler lifestyles, and thus were more suitable for his study than say, Parisians. In 1888, van Gogh would leave the bustling city for the more calming, beautiful countryside of southern France, where many Impressionists before had fallen in love with the landscapes and abundance of natural light.

During 1888, van Gogh and Gauguin exchanged various self portraits with each other as a way to communicate how they wished the world to view them and their art. In this portrait, Gauguin paints himself in a rough manner, as an outlaw even. The title, “Les Miserables,” was of course a very popular French Romantic work by Victor Hugo at the time (and still remains a classic today), and he painted himself in the guise of Jean Valjean, an ex-convict, because he viewed himself as an outcast from decadent society. Van Gogh, however, expressed displeasure with this painting, because he believed
that it expressed torment while failing to offer any hope or consolation”. Both men were fascinated with Japanese block prints at this time, and their influence is obvious in the two-dimensional, bright colors of the wallpaper behind Gauguin.

Image source

Reblogged from art for art's sake

wetheurban:

ART: Sky Art Illustrations by Thomas Lamadieu

Genius French artist Thomas Lamadieu has illustrated a series of scenes in the sky directly onto photographs of urban landscapes.

Read More

Reblogged from NPR

blackfashion:

Vlisco “Bloom” Collection Spring 2014

This season, we share our admiration for the silent power and splendour of flowers and the vibrant women who wear them with such grace. Even the pattern, which is normally indigo, is now applied in bordeaux, adding more warmth and depth to the fabrics. 

Reblogged from BLACK FASHION
Reblogged from Art is my Hustle

ingloriousbasterd:

Reposting just for the sheer fact that she is actually perfect!

Reblogged from Live Fast Die Old.

marycwells:

Patsy just gets me.

The queen of country in my professional opinion

Patsy Cline - “I Fall to Pieces” 

Reblogged from MCW

talebee:

Patsy Cline - Three Cigarettes in an Ashtray

One of my faves from her. :)

Reblogged from Jesus back
rocknrollwitches:

Patsy Cline

Let’s take a minute to talk about the SERIOUS beauty that is Patsy Cline.

rocknrollwitches:

Patsy Cline

Let’s take a minute to talk about the SERIOUS beauty that is Patsy Cline.

Reblogged from SmileLiveDreamLove
egbudiwe:

☆

egbudiwe:

arjoparadox:

I got new glasses.

arjoparadox:

I got new glasses.

Reblogged from Arjo Paradox